Calls for Ban on ‘Electric Shock’ Chewing Gum

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The Consumers Association of Penang (CAP) has urged the government to ban a new chewing gum on the market which is capable of delivering a sharp ‘electric shock.’

CAP said it is concerned that the product, which sells for RM6 at night markets and toy shops, may be hazardous to consumers, especially children.

Ida Nadirah

Designed to look like Wrigley’s chewing gum, the novelty toy contains a strip of ‘gum’ which can be pulled out, triggering a switch which sends a jolt of electric shock through the arm.

“The product is very much like (a regular) chewing gum, but with a piece of the gum sticking out to be pulled. Once the piece is pulled, a switch is triggered to send an electrical current through the (gum).

Amir Irsyad Omar

“In our survey, we found that (the product) is available in the form of pens and pistols. (When you use) the ‘pen’ or pull the trigger of the ‘pistol’ you will feel a vibration,” CAP president SM Mohamed Idris said.

Questioning the safety of such an item, the group called for the Domestic Trade Co-Operatives and Consumerism ministry (KPDNKK) to determine how the product was able to enter the country.

“The ministry must immediately look into this matter as the novelty toy manufacturer replicated Wrigley’s chewing gum and is selling it as a dangerous toy. If it is not a dangerous toy then why must the manufacturer print the health warning on the toy and its packaging?

“Moreover, the law states that registered children’s’ toy manufacturers and distributors must attach a Certificate of Conformance to obtain a certified MC KPDNKK logo before it is marketed,” Mohamed said, referring to the Malaysia Conformity logo.

Zulaikha Zainuzman

“We are keen to know how such dangerous toys can be imported and sold under the very noses of the authorities.”

He said that the relevant authorities should ban the toy as it is not a ‘novelty’ for a person to experience the pain of an electric shock.

“Besides the numerous hazardous toys that are on sale in supermarkets, shops and stalls throughout the country, there are novelty items that are capable of giving an electric shock that have made a comeback.

“Such devices also come in the form of novelty pens and toy pistols which gives the person using the pen or pressing the trigger of the pistol a sharp electric shock,” he said.

Mohamed has advised the public to refrain from buying such items which may cause harm to others.

“They might think that it is amusing but it is not so to the person who suffers the agonising pain besides being a potential danger to those with health concerns,” he said.